Every school to have a careers leader?

It’s looking more and more likely that the long-awaited government career strategy will be published in the next couple of months, and that the new statutory guidance will follow early in 2018.

The Career Management Quality Alliance (a new sector-wide body who represent Assessment Services Ltd, the Career Development Institute (CDI), Careers England and the Quality in Careers Consortium) have put together a position statement that summarises their recommendations for what the new strategy should include.

The Career Management Quality Alliance recommendations:

  • The strategy must set out a vision that support for career management should be available to everyone throughout life, and it should pay equal attention to services for young people and for adults.

 

  • The focus should be on both enabling individuals to develop the skills and qualities needed to plan and manage their own careers (commonly referred to as ‘career management and employability skills’) and providing access to personal career guidance at times when it is needed.

 

 

  • The statutory duty to provide careers education in the curriculum should be reinstated and raised to age 18. It should be supported by a recommended national framework of career management and employability skills.

 

  • All schools and colleges should be strongly recommended to achieve the Quality in Careers Standard and incentivised to do so through development funding linked to a commitment to achieving the Standard.

 

  • To meet the statutory duty to secure access to impartial careers guidance, schools and colleges should be required to use the services only of careers advisers with a professional qualification in career guidance and, where they commission services from an external organisation, they should ensure that the organisation is accredited to the matrix Standard.

 

  • A network of Career Development Co-ordinators should be established across the country, to work with the Enterprise Co-ordinators in the LEPs (whose work focuses on the two Gatsby benchmarks that relate to engaging with employers), to support schools and college with their careers programmes.

 

  • The specification for the National Careers Service should be revised to ensure that its services reach all adults and that it provides support for developing career management and employability skills as well as information, advice and guidance. Its services should also be extended to young people who are NEET, home educated or not in school or college for any other reason.

 

  • All careers advisers working in the National Careers Service must hold, or be working towards, an appropriate professional qualification.

 

  • All organisations providing career management and employability services, through the National Careers Service and other publicly funded support, must be accredited to the matrix Standard.

 

  •  Private sector organisations and traders providing career management services that are not publicly-funded, should be encouraged to use professionally qualified staff and to work towards the matrix Standard.

 

  • The Government should investigate how changes to the tax system and development loans could encourage both individuals and employers to invest in career management support.

 


Careers England said, in their announcement of the statement: Everyone is agreed that for the UK to remain competitive and for our economy to grow in a global market, the nation will need to be more self-sufficient in developing the skills of its workforce. This is at the heart of the latest Industrial Strategy.

Virginia Isaac added “There is an enormous amount of good will to make this happen. Across the board, educators and business people want this to succeed. Careers professionals are ready to give high quality, lifelong support for career management – all we need is for Government to fire the starting gun and recognise the huge value that career professionals bring to all our futures.”

Read the statement in full here